Liquid to Gas. (Evaporation).

When a liquid changes over to a gas or vapor it is known as evaporation. Evaporation starts when vapor bubbles form in any liquid. Evaporation's speed varies and can begin faster if heat is placed above the liquid and the liquid's heat is raised. Evaporation will absorb the heat when it is taking place, and this is called latent heat of evaporation. Evaporation is basically when a liquid gets heated and it turns into a vapor and proceeds up into the atmosphere.

There is one more way a liquid can change over to a gas, and this is by boiling. Boiling takes places when the vapor pressure of a liquid is the same as the external pressure that the liquid is exposed to, and this a formation when bubbles of vapor are in the inside of a liquid. This formation is know as boiling. Boiling can happen at any temperature it all depends on what liquid it is. Boiling can cause the water to turn into a vapor because the vapor inside will sometimes let out.Water boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit and other liquids vary on the temperature they boil at.

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Gas to Liquid. (Condensation).
Condensation is when a liquid changes to a gas or vapor. The result of condensation makes our clouds,dew, and frost. When a gas goes through condensation it must cool down first, and be compressed. The vapors molecules of liquid collect and form a liquid again. They collect because the tiny dust particles come into contact with them and they start to collect around them. This will form a drop of this liquid. Condensation happens a lot of times that's why it rains because these droplets that are formed fall and this is known as precipitation.





Resources.
Pic. (Below).
http://e21.grolier.com/search_media?search_text=condensation&page=1&lexilebegin=&lexileend=&readinglvl=&search_type= Click on Figures 1 and 2. Surface Molecules of Liquid (art work)

Info. (Below).
Evaporation. (2011). In Encyclopedia Americana. Retrieved February 13, 2011, from Grolier Online http://e21.grolier.com/article?id=0148730-00&product_id=ea&searchTerm=evaporation&queryParser=Grolier_En&docKey=Li4vLi4vc2VhcmNoL2NvbnRlbnQvZWE0L3RleHQvMDk1LzAxNDg3MzAtMDAuaHRtbEBnbzI*

Gorin, G. (2011). Evaporation. In Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Retrieved February 13, 2011, from Grolier Online http://e21.grolier.com/article?id=0101030-0&product_id=gme&searchTerm=evaporation&queryParser=Grolier_En&docKey=Li4vLi4vc2VhcmNoL2NvbnRlbnQvZ21lMy90ZXh0LzEyMC8wMTAxMDMwLTAuaHRtbEBnbzI*

Sebera, D. K. (2011). Boiling. In Encyclopedia Americana. Retrieved February 13, 2011, from Grolier Online http://e21.grolier.com/article?id=0052660-00&product_id=ea&searchTerm=boiling%20evaporation&queryParser=Grolier_En&docKey=Li4vLi4vc2VhcmNoL2NvbnRlbnQvZWE0L3RleHQvMDcxLzAwNTI2NjAtMDAuaHRtbEBnbzI*

Liebeskind, H. (2011). Condensation. In Encyclopedia Americana. Retrieved February 14, 2011, from Grolier Online http://e21.grolier.com/article?id=0104330-00&product_id=ea&searchTerm=condensation&queryParser=Grolier_En&docKey=Li4vLi4vc2VhcmNoL2NvbnRlbnQvZWE0L3RleHQvMDk0LzAxMDQzMzAtMDAuaHRtbEBnbzI*

Gallant, Roy A. "Clouds." Reviewed by Jerome Spar. The New Book of Knowledge. Grolier Online. 2011 http://e21.grolier.com/article?id=a2005840-h&product_id=nbk

"Condensation." Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Grolier Online. 2011. http://e21.grolier.com/article?id=0069613-0&product_id=gme&searchTerm=condensation&queryParser=Grolier_En&docKey=Li4vLi4vc2VhcmNoL2NvbnRlbnQvZ21lMy90ZXh0LzA3OC8wMDY5NjEzLTAuaHRtbEBnbzI*